Frequently Asked Questions

Over 30 years ago, the World Health Organization (WHO), made it a goal to have all healthcare providers take on a biopsychosocial approach to health. Unfortunately, most of the world including the United States has been slow to adopt this modern scientific approach to helping people with their health. The biopsychosocial model addresses 3 factors: biology, psychology, and sociology.

Biology includes your anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics. It’s important to be very thorough to rule out more serious issues.

Psychology includes your mood, what you think and feel, and how you hold yourself. All these factors influence the state of your body and how you recover from injury and pain.

Sociology includes your relationships with family, friends, your work and communities. These relationships have a dramatic impact on your biology and mental health.

With a completed picture we are better able to understand the complex series of influences that could be causing or prolonging your condition. Only then can we develop a recovery plan to overcome your pain and movement challenges.

Skilled physical therapy services are provided by licensed physical therapists for the treatment of illness or injury to help you recover from pain and functional limitations. Our licensed physical therapists can provide physical therapy services both, with or without, physician referral in the state of Michigan. We can evaluate and treat illness and injury for 10 visits or 21 days without physician consultation.

During, or after this time, we can re-assess and determine whether your condition has improved enough that you could continue with our Movement and Wellness programs, or whether we would need to consult with a physician for continuing treatment.

If your physician has already referred you for physical therapy services, we do not have to worry about these time limits and will work closely with your physician in ensuring your treatment is appropriate and uninterrupted.

“Injury does not mean pain, and pain does not mean ongoing injury.”

“Sports medicine clinicians who treat athletes in pain must first identify the nature of the pain: Is it pain consistent with an injury, or is it pain that is more consistent with some other biomechanical, psychological, social, or addiction factors?”
From the US Military advocates, the use of the Biopsychosocial model for its soldiers and veterans.”

“Pain is a uniquely individual, subjective experience and, because of this, must be treated using multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approaches.”

DMR meets an exceeds international standards for the treatment of pain in athletes. Learn what the International Olympic Committee and US Military expects of sports medicine clinicians below

Have further questions?

Normal Pain-Free Spine
Changes Over A Lifetime

SPINAL DEGENERATION sounds scary but it’s just a technical word for NORMAL AGING!

The spine begins to undergo completely normal, age-related changes at around age 13, and by our 40’s, our spine has already gone through a LOT of changes that we may not even be aware of.

Normal age-related changes of the spine include disc height loss, disc bulges and protrusions, and many other terms that sound bad, but generally aren’t.

Check out all these normal changes that the spine will undergo over time without pain or other symptoms!

In extremely rare cases (less than 10% chance!), these changes can take up too much free space around the nerve and surgery may be helpful to clear some space for the nerve to breath better.

Occasionally, there are minor injuries that may occur with these spinal changes that may result in an inflammatory “chemical soup” in the space around the nerves of the spine. These “soups” may sometimes cause problems, including pain, but they will typically resolve themselves all on their own.

Healthcare professionals who specialize in pain and movement can help you through the recovery process if you need backup.

Tonosu, Juichi, et al. “The associations between magnetic resonance imaging findings and low back pain: A 10-year longitudinal analysis.” PloS one 12.11 (2017): e0188057.

Brinjikji, W., et al. “Systematic literature review of imaging features of spinal degeneration in asymptomatic populations.” American Journal of Neuroradiology 36.4 (2015): 811-816

Suri, Pradeep, et al. “Longitudinal associations between incident lumbar spine MRI findings and chronic low back pain or radicular symptoms: retrospective analysis of data from the longitudinal assessment of imaging and disability of the back (LAIDBACK).” BMC musculoskeletal disorders 15.1 (2014): 152.

Tertti, M. O., et al. “Low-back pain and disk degeneration in children: a case-control MR imaging study.” Radiology 180.2 (1991): 503-507.

SPINAL DEGENERATION sounds scary but it’s just a technical word for NORMAL AGING!

The spine begins to undergo completely normal, age-related changes at around age 13, and by our 40’s, our spine has already gone through a LOT of changes that we may not even be aware of.

Normal age-related changes of the spine include disc height loss, disc bulges and protrusions, and many other terms that sound bad, but generally aren’t.

Check out all these normal changes that the spine will undergo over time without pain or other symptoms!

In extremely rare cases (less than 10% chance!), these changes can take up too much free space around the nerve and surgery may be helpful to clear some space for the nerve to breath better.

Occasionally, there are minor injuries that may occur with these spinal changes that may result in an inflammatory “chemical soup” in the space around the nerves of the spine. These “soups” may sometimes cause problems, including pain, but they will typically resolve themselves all on their own.

Healthcare professionals who specialize in pain and movement can help you through the recovery process if you need backup.

Tonosu, Juichi, et al. “The associations between magnetic resonance imaging findings and low back pain: A 10-year longitudinal analysis.” PloS one 12.11 (2017): e0188057.

Brinjikji, W., et al. “Systematic literature review of imaging features of spinal degeneration in asymptomatic populations.” American Journal of Neuroradiology 36.4 (2015): 811-816

Suri, Pradeep, et al. “Longitudinal associations between incident lumbar spine MRI findings and chronic low back pain or radicular symptoms: retrospective analysis of data from the longitudinal assessment of imaging and disability of the back (LAIDBACK).” BMC musculoskeletal disorders 15.1 (2014): 152.

Tertti, M. O., et al. “Low-back pain and disk degeneration in children: a case-control MR imaging study.” Radiology 180.2 (1991): 503-507.

What you need to know about us during the Covid-19 outbreak!Learn More >